Tuesday, May 17, 2016

More on Pollen... Tips for Survival





More on Pollen

It must be noted that early buds on the trees arrive with considerable pollen. Without going into intricate scientific explanations, it may be simply stated that the pollen of most trees, shrubs, and grasses is lighter than the pollen of flowers. It may be carried by the wind as high as three miles up and as far as 100 miles from the original plant. Easily inhaled, it is the culprit of the condition called hay fever (or allergies) as it may irritate an individual’s throat and nose.
As way of compensation, the pollen on flowers that arrive later in the season is generally much heavier… meaning it does not tend to blow about with such a vengeance. Thus as the season progresses, misery may ease a bit.

Tips to Survive:
*Do not invite pollen inside by opening doors and windows for fresh air on pretty days… there is no fresh air during pollen season.
*A thorough spring cleaning of the house, top to bottom to remove dust.
*Postponing morning coffee in the garden until after ten when overnight pollen has settled.
*Stay inside on hot, dry, windy days if at all possible…
*Do not hang laundry, especially sheets, on the line as allergens collect on them.
*Wash your hands after playing in the yard, wash your hair before bed, and change your pillowcase daily.
*Be aware of high mold spore counts after a heavy rain or in the evening. Dizziness and/or blurry vision are clues the spore count is high.

*Hydration is very necessary... and since allergy compounds tend to dry out the system, an increase in water is a total necessity. I read of an account during the war in Iraq where soldiers were in confinement when one had an allergic reaction and was unable to breathe. Another soldier provided him with water and told him to keep drinking it until he could catch his breath... it worked and he totally recovered in several minutes. If going outside take a glass of water with you and sip it often.

If necessary, take a medication for Allergies: 
For basic relief, take an Antihistamine. There are many kinds of antihistamines, most of which do not require a prescription. The antihistamines that have been around for a long time are called first-generation antihistamines which have been used for many years and are considered safe and effective. Some of the best-known ones are Benadryl, Demeaned, Chlor-Trimeton and Zirtec-D. The main negative to these antihistamines is that they cause most people to become sleepy, however this effect may be modified if one takes a low dose headache remedy containing caffeine, which combats the drowsiness with no ill effects.
A Decongestant such as Sudafed opens up the nose, makes breathing easier, and reduces drainage. The decongestants tend to be a stimulant for many people so when using combination of antihistamine and decongestant, the decongestant helps to counter the sedating characteristic of the antihistamine.
Note:
Second-Generation Antihistamines such as Allegra and Claritin do not cause drowsiness, but are much more expensive with Allegra requiring a prescription.  Loratdine does not require a prescription, is easily available, and the site suggests it as one of the first things to try when having allergy problems.

Scientists assure our species will adapt to the ‘new’ environment and survive. I certainly hope they are correct... if they are not, the plants shall inherit the Earth.